Watch… An iceberg the size of London breaks off from Antarctica

Watch… An iceberg the size of London breaks off from Antarctica
Watch… An iceberg the size of London breaks off from Antarctica
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The British Antarctic Survey announced that a huge iceberg with an area of ​​1,550 square kilometers broke away from the Brent ice shelf in the pole, on Sunday, during a spring tidal wave.

The size of the huge ice formation is approximately the size of the British city of London and its surrounding suburbs. And unlike many similar iceberg events in recent years, the researchers said they don’t believe climate change is responsible for the giant iceberg’s breakup.

Dominic Hodgson, a glaciologist with the British Antarctic Survey, said: “This break-up event was expected and is part of the normal behavior of the Brent Ice Shelf and is not linked to climate change.”

The crack in the ice sheet, which the researchers named “Kazim-1”, was discovered years ago. In the years that followed, the gap widened until the iceberg broke.

The iceberg, which the US National Ice Center has not named, is now expected to drift downstream along the Antarctic coast like previous massive icebergs.

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British glacier researchers will continue to monitor the glacier.

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It is noteworthy that last year, researchers linked the separation of a 1,200-square-kilometer iceberg to climate change, as the melting of sea ice was greatly accelerated by rising temperatures.

The British Antarctic Survey operates a research station on the Brent Ice Shelf in the Antarctic region. The research group moved the station about 20 kilometers inland in 2016 so that it would not be endangered by giant iceberg break-up events, such as those recently observed from the station.

The researchers work from the station during the Antarctic summer, which runs from November to March. For the rest of the year, researchers at Britain’s University of Cambridge monitor the region using satellite imagery from the European Space Agency and the US Space Agency, as well as the German Terrasar-X satellite. The Brent Ice Shelf is the most closely monitored ice shelf on Earth, according to the British Antarctic Survey.

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