Amazigh associations defend Tapamrant’s music against “Salafi discourses” in Sous

Amazigh associations defend Tapamrant’s music against “Salafi discourses” in Sous
Amazigh associations defend Tapamrant’s music against “Salafi discourses” in Sous
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Several Amazigh associations rejected the attacks on the Moroccan singer Fatima Taabamrant during the past few days, after Salafist faces came out to disparage what she presented to the Amazigh song and culture with “harsh words that affect her dignity,” according to what was stated in a statement by the aforementioned bodies.

Amazigh associations and events expressed their astonishment at “the blatant attack on the icon of Amazigh musical art and poet Fatima Tabamrant, in a widely circulated video clip; A video that dares to mention the Amazigh music and imply the Amazigh culture in Morocco.”

Fatima Tabaamrant, a Moroccan artist, one of the most prominent symbols of Amazigh music, who started her career since the eighties of the last century, and sang about many topics, foremost among them identity, life, women and love, was (subjected to) a sharp attack from Salafist faces who broadcast video clips on social media.

The same source rejected “moral value judgments that derive their vision from a voice that narrows down art and the various manifestations of human life and joy, and the various carriers of Moroccan memory in their difference and diversity, bypassing the necessary objectivity and responsibility in freedom of expression of opinion, and drawn to moral defamation.”

The same associations explained that “Fatima Tabaa Amrant was able for decades to open wide horizons for Amazigh art, and her voice was able to win a fertile echo in the various cities and villages of Morocco; An artist who sang beauty, life, freedom, hope and identity, and championed noble universal values.

The same source confirmed that it is “a Salafi vision that tries to limit the resounding vigor of the Amazigh culture, begging for a vulgar saying that fills the shadows of affirmation with the impossibility of a more creative possibility than it was, and recites various expressions of severe abuse firmly rooted in the depths of meaninglessness.”

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And the same bodies considered that “the great preoccupation with this discourse on the part of society is the result of many defects, and a cultural upbringing that needs permanent dismantling,” stressing that “some people should not forget the radiance of the contributions that provide great services to Moroccan culture, from the anthologies of Al-Ruwais and Al-Aita and scientific and academic works.” On Moroccan and Amazigh history and culture.

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Ahmed Bouzid, a researcher in Amazigh culture and music, recorded that “the attack through contemporary digital media by the digital sheikhs on Amazigh culture in general, and on the Amazigh musician Fatima Tamemrant in particular, is inseparable from the vision of the world that feeds from its margins this digital saying, which She is deeply aware of the central roles of the arts in spreading the values ​​of difference and coexistence.

Bouzid added, in a statement to Hespress, that it is “a testament to the ability of art to build the human being and to reside in various spaces in social life, in a way that contributes to building the human being and strengthening his critical thinking, the human being as the wealth of building the nation.”

The speaker explained that “this symbolic violence that affects artistic expressions and their producers is linked to the context of the nineties and beyond, which is the context of the return of fundamentalist thought and the return of murderous identities to the Maghreb space.” and its vigor.”

Bouzid recalled, in the same context, what happened to the Algerian singer Matoub Lounas and Cheb Hosni, and what Cheb Khaled was subjected to for decades, adding that the matter is not related to Fatima Tabamrant alone, but it means her identity and what she accepted in the presence in contemporary times, adding: “The point is Art, the art about which the cosmic poet Mahmoud Darwish wrote, addressing death, “I defeated you, O death of all arts.” Art against the culture of death and alienation.

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