Breast Cancer Awareness in Japan: Early detection of breast cancer saves your life

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health and medicine

In Japan, one in ten women will develop breast cancer during her lifetime. Efforts such as the Pink Ribbon campaign in October boosted awareness of the disease among Japanese women, including the need for self-examinations and other types of early detection, which when performed increase the survival rate to more than 90%. However, it is too late to recognize common risk factors.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month worldwide. In Japan, movements such as the Pink Ribbon Campaign have drawn attention to the disease, which currently affects one in ten Japanese women during their lifetime.

IT company A10 Lab recently conducted a survey on breast cancer awareness among users of the Minchalle motivation app. When asked if they knew about the Pink Ribbon campaign that promotes greater understanding of the disease and the importance of early detection, 77% of women, or about 2,500 women, and 59% of men, or 380 men answered in the affirmative.

While the survey found greater awareness of the importance of early detection in increasing the chance of breast cancer survival, far fewer people understand the general risk factors for the disease. About 80% of respondents, or 2,380 people, knew the importance of regular breast self-examination. However, less than 25% realized that habits such as smoking and regular consumption of alcohol as well as being overweight increase the likelihood of developing breast cancer.

The survey also asked how often women do self-examinations. About 80% of respondents said they had used the screening method, but only about 30% said they had done so without hesitation. Self-examination was more common among the older age groups, while few teenage women used the technique.

(Originally written in Japanese, translated from English, title image by Pixta)

Tokyo
Medicine
regenerative medicine
Psychological health





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