The discovery of a new Corona virus that does not infect humans

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An ecology researcher finally revealed a new Corona virus, living in British bats.
And Evana Murphy, a researcher at the University of “East Anglia” in England, found the virus, after collecting the droppings of bats known as a type of “horseshoe”, in Gloucestershire.
And according to the British newspaper “Daily Mail”, it is the first time that “SARPIC virus”, which is the umbrella term for a number of viruses, including SARS-Cove-2, has been found in bats in the United Kingdom.
The discovered new virus, RhGH01, is not able to infect humans in its current state, but scientists warn against contact with the animal.
Research papers co-authored by the Zoological Society in London, the University of “East Anglia” and the British Public Health Authority stated that preventing the transmission of the SARS-Cove-2 virus to bats is critical in light of the current global vaccination campaign against the virus.
The researchers did not rule out that the discovered virus mutated to become capable of infecting humans, calling not to approach it.
In an interview with The Times, Ivana said, “Like all wild animals, if bats are left alone, they do not pose any threat.”
Ivana Murphy tested 53 bats, where she collected their feces in sterile bags, before releasing the animals.
In order to avoid any pollution, Ivana was keen to wear protective equipment, during her search for the Covid-19 virus.
The samples were sent for virological analysis at the Public Health Authority laboratory in England, where it was discovered that one of the bats was infected with the new virus in its droppings.
Commenting on the results of the research, Diana Bell, a professor and expert in zoonotic diseases at the University of “East Anglia”, said, “We need to implement strict regulations worldwide for anyone dealing with bats and other wild animals, in order to avoid an outbreak of any new type of Corona virus.”





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