The second wave of Corona strikes European airlines … distress and write-offs

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The aviation sector is exposed to the second Corona storm, which prompted “Lufthansa” to demand the suspension of the take-off and landing rights, and KLM is also studying the removal of jobs.

Carsten Schwer, chief executive of German airline Lufthansa, has demanded that the European Union continue to suspend take off and landing rights at crowded airports.

In a speech to the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol), Shapoor said Thursday that if the current proposal of the commission regarding next summer continues, then it is possible that Lufthansa will see itself forced to operate free of passengers and harmful flights to the environment in order to preserve the rights of attractive For take-off and landing “That would be crazy.”

It is noteworthy that the rights to take off and land at important airports at certain times is the core of the system in complex companies such as Lufthansa, which can only make long-distance flights by switching between aircraft.

In order to preserve the take-off and landing rights for the next season, companies must use at least 80% of these rights in normal times, or they will be re-granted by the supervisory authorities again.

The take-off and landing rights were suspended worldwide due to the Corona crisis.

The European Union had proposed a summer trip schedule stipulating that companies should use at least 40% of these rights in order to be guaranteed to retain them for the next season.

The desired recovery for air traffic has not yet occurred due to the emergence of new mutations of the Corona virus and the continuing restrictions on travel.

For his part, Eurocontrol President Eamon Brennan said that transport traffic in Europe is currently equivalent to only 14% of its level last year, and he expected the situation to be worse in February.

Shapur said that this year will witness a strong recovery “sometime next summer” as a result of the increase in vaccinations and tests, pointing out that the company is losing one million euros (1.2 million dollars) every two hours, in a “great improvement” from the situation during the height of the Covid-19 crisis.

He added that Lufthansa, which was losing at twice that rate at some point last year, had cut losses and restricted flights to destinations generating positive cash flows thanks to higher air freight rates.

The group received a subsidy of 9 billion euros last year, guaranteeing the government a 20% stake in it.

Spur said Lufthansa has so far spent 3 billion euros of the cash it received, and it may not spend the whole amount.

He added that the airline still hopes for a strong recovery in travel traffic starting from the summer, and that it expects to work at 40 to 60 percent of pre-crisis capacity over the entire year.

Dutch KLM eliminates 1,000 jobs

The Dutch airline KLM, a subsidiary of the “Air France-KLM” group, announced Thursday that it plans to cut between 800 and 1,000 jobs in light of the emerging Corona virus pandemic, in addition to the 5,000 jobs that were removed last year.

The company said that the number of jobs that were written off last year is not enough to compensate for the company’s losses as a result of travel restrictions imposed by countries around the world due to the pandemic.

The company added that the ongoing international procedures and restrictions on travel have made the recovery slower, especially for long-haul airlines.

The company had received support from the Dutch government worth 3.4 billion euros (4.1 billion dollars) during the crisis.

KLM’s announcement of the job cuts came a day after the Dutch government moved to tighten travel restrictions, including a ban on flights from Britain, South Africa and South America.





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