You may recover without realizing that you were infected in the first place .. 6 signs that you were infected with Coronavirus!

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Doctors say that a large percentage of people may have already contracted the Coronavirus and then recovered from the disease without even realizing it, as many people who do not show symptoms despite having the disease are fortunate.

But is there a way that I know if I really did catch the disease and recovered from it later? Here are 6 signs that you might:
Can I have Coronavirus without knowing?

The answer is: Yes. “Most people with Coronavirus have an uncomplicated case of infection, which can be distinguished from a cold or the flu,” explains infectious disease expert Amish Adalja with a MD.

In addition, 40% of people infected with the virus have no symptoms at all, according to estimates by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Unfortunately, there is no way to be 100% certain that you have contracted the Coronavirus without showing any symptoms or whether the slight symptoms you experienced were just a cold or the common flu.

But experts say some of the signs could be information indicating that you may already have COVID-19.

Here are the most important of those signs:

Can I have Coronavirus without knowing?
1. I suffered from a very bad cold

According to the Prevention website, scientists believe that the Corona virus has spread in the United States much earlier than the date of the first infection in the country.

After analyzing throat swabs taken from people suspected of having influenza prior to the spread of Corona in China, researchers discovered that for every two cases of influenza there is one case that was later diagnosed as Covid 19.

In other words, there were a large number of people who were infected with the Coronavirus and then recovered from it without realizing it, thinking that their symptoms were nothing but ordinary flu.

It may be difficult to distinguish between the flu and the mild form of the Coronavirus without testing, but colds do not usually cause shortness of breath, severe headache, or gastrointestinal symptoms such as those caused by the virus.

Here is the full list of symptoms that indicate infection with the Coronavirus:

Fever or chills

cough

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

fatigue

Muscle or body pain

Headache

Loss of sense of taste or smell

Sore throat

Congestion or runny nose

Nausea or vomiting

Diarrhea
2. I lost my sense of smell or taste at some point

Initial data from the American Academy of Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery found that 27% of people with coronavirus who lost their sense of smell showed improvement within approximately 7 days without developing symptoms, while most of them got better within 10 days.

So it is possible that you had contracted the virus and recovered from it without realizing it, and you were limited to losing the sense of smell and taste along with some other mild symptoms.

It should be noted that it is also possible to lose these senses temporarily when suffering from other respiratory diseases, such as cold, influenza, sinusitis, or even with seasonal allergies.

Can I have Coronavirus without knowing?
3. I experienced unexplained hair loss

This has not been extensively studied in cases of MERS-CoV infection, but many people who have recovered from the virus have reported problems with hair loss.

Actress Alyssa Milano, who has been suffering from symptoms of the virus for months, shared a video clip on Instagram as she talks about hair loss problems that have appeared since her infection with the virus.

While unexplained hair loss may actually indicate that you have the disease without realizing it, Dr. Adalja says it may also be due to a condition known as telogen effluvium, and it can be caused by a large number of factors, including pregnancy, severe stress, weight loss and other illnesses. Non-Covid 19.
4. You feel short of breath at times

Research published in the Journal of JAMA found that people who contracted the coronavirus and then recovered from it could develop after-effects of the virus, including shortness of breath.

It is not entirely clear why patients may experience shortness of breath even after recovering from the virus, but it is likely that this is due to permanent inflammation of the lungs.

Therefore, according to the doctors, if you suffer from idiopathic shortness of breath and your tests show negative results for Corona virus, this may indicate that you had contracted the virus earlier without knowing and then recovered from it later with effects that did not go away, such as shortness of breath.
5. You suffer from a persistent cough

A persistent cough is another symptom reported by people who have participated in the JAMA study and the cough is often dry.

This symptom is very common, as data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 43% of people who contracted the Coronavirus and recovered later, still have a cough.
6. You feel permanently tired

One of the most prominent symptoms that may remain associated with the patient even after recovering from the virus is constant fatigue.

One study found that 53% of recovered patients remained fatigued for a period of about 60 days after their diagnosis.

So fatigue may be a sign of contracting the virus earlier, but bear in mind that fatigue is a really common problem and it can be a sign of many different other health issues.

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