Transporting the Corona vaccine needs 8,000 jet aircraft, in the most difficult task in history – thought and art – the last page

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A vaccine against the emerging corona virus will be good news for everyone, but it will also represent an unprecedented challenge for airlines, which will have to transport tons of vaccines in a record time.

And according to Sky News quoted by the British newspaper “The Guardian”, shipping the anti-virus vaccine around the world will be the biggest challenge the aviation sector has ever faced, as it will require the equivalent of 8,000 huge jet aircraft, to provide a single dose of 7.8 billion people in the world.

The International Air Transport Association warned of severe capacity restrictions, which could hamper efforts to quickly deliver the vaccine to all parts of the world.

As pharmaceutical companies race to develop a vaccine and get approval from health authorities, the International Aviation Group is working with airlines, airports, health authorities and pharmaceutical companies to draft an “air transport plan.”

“The process of securely providing Covid-19 vaccines is the” mission of the century “for the global air sector, said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA Director-General.” But that will not happen without prior and careful planning. Now is the time. We urge governments to take the lead in … Facilitating logistical cooperation so that facilities, security arrangements and border operations are ready for the next huge and complex task. ”

Although just providing a single dose to 7.8 billion people, which is the world’s population, will fill 8,000 Boeing 747 cargo planes, any vaccine may require multiple doses.

Vaccines must also be stored at a certain temperature, which means that not all aircraft are suitable for the sensitive mission.

The “AstraZeneca” pharmaceutical group, on Thursday, confirmed that the availability of a vaccine against Covid-19 is still possible by the end of the year, despite the suspension of experiments on its project, which it is leading in partnership with the University of Oxford.

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