Coronavirus: Fact-finding on allegations of selling kits for infection detection tests in 2017

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            <img class="js-image-replace" alt="False allegations spread on social media about tests to detect infection with the Coronavirus and temperature lobe devices" src="https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/45EC/production/_114400971_untitled.png" width="640" height="360"/>



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             <span class="story-image-copyright">Getty Images</span>

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                False allegations spread on social media about tests to detect infection with the Coronavirus and temperature lobe devices
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    </figure><p class="story-body__introduction">Six months after the Coronavirus was declared a global pandemic, false allegations are still circulating on social media. 

Here is a review of the latest that has been widely circulated In this regard:

First claim: Number Covid-19 tests were being exported before the outbreak

Verdict: A database of global shipments of chemical supplies established in 2020, but dating back to 2015, has already indicated such use of “COVID-19 detection testing equipment” (that is, chemicals used in viral infection testing). The World Bank, which is one of the institutions responsible for maintaining these lists, says the reason for this is that these products were already in place before they were currently used for tests to detect Covid-19 infection. The website has now been updated and a clarification posted.

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                A misleading post alleging that COVID-19 screening tests were sold out in 2017
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    </figure><p>The allegation circulating on social media - and which proponents of the conspiracy theory adheres - indicates that this is evidence that the epidemic was planned all along and that the World Bank was aware of it. 

This is not true and we can dispel any doubts about what is happening.

The image circulated is correct and includes trade information under the heading “Exports of Covid-19 test equipment to each country in 2017”. Other pages refer to previous years and similar data. Then you can understand why this might have caused some confusion.

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                A picture from the official World Bank website that was circulated on social media before it was updated and the materials listed on it were classified as "medical tests."
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    </figure><p>According to the World Bank, the page was created in April 2020 to facilitate the process of identifying all pre-existing products that are currently being used in COVID-19 testing equipment.

All chemical products listed on the site are being used for multiple purposes over the years, but the World Bank says that what has happened is reclassifying them to facilitate tracking of items of special importance in facing the Corona virus.

Since September, the database’s title has been changed to “Medical Examination Equipment,” and to avoid further misunderstanding, a warning has been added stating: “The data recorded here relate to pre-existing medical equipment that is currently classified by the World Customs Organization as necessary to confront COVID-19.” .

It appears that the conspiracy theory allegations surfaced on social media last week and has since spread to several platforms and languages.

The allegations surfaced on Twitter and Facebook almost simultaneously, but only received attention after a Facebook user in the United Kingdom posted a video recording an alleged inconsistency in the test equipment data on 5 September.

After that, links and images to the database spread more widely on Facebook and Twitter, as well as on Reddit, Instagram and WhatsApp applications.

The allegations also spread to other languages, including Dutch, Italian, German, Polish, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese and Hebrew.

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             <span class="off-screen">Image source</span>
             <span class="story-image-copyright">EPA</span>

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                Infrared thermometers do no harm
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    </figure><p><strong>The second claim: </strong><strong>Degree measuring devices</strong><strong>  Infrared heat </strong><strong>T</strong><strong>Brain damage</strong>

Verdict: Error. These devices are not harmful.

The sight of a person having a temperature checked by a measuring device aimed at the head is common these days.

These measuring devices record a person’s temperature by measuring the infrared radiation emitted from the body.

One of the possible symptoms of infection with the Coronavirus is a high temperature.

A video posted on YouTube and recorded by 2 million views claims the operation is dangerous.

But it is not dangerous and there is a simple explanation for this.

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                A misleading post quotes an Australian nurse as saying that infrared thermometers can cause brain damage
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    </figure><p>The thermometer records the infrared radiation emitted from the body - the surfaces of all objects emit this type of emissions - but it does not emit anything at the person.

The presenter talks about the concerns of an unnamed “Australian nurse”, and specifically refers to potential harm to these scales on the pineal gland.

This gland is concentrated in the brain cavity and controls the secretion of the hormone melatonin, and the man calls it “the gateway to the world of the soul.”

However, the pineal gland cannot be damaged or “targeted” with a thermometer.

“It just records the infrared radiation emitted from your body. It doesn’t shoot you anything,” says Stafford Lightman, professor of medicine at the University of Bristol.

As for the claims that a wrist thermometer is safer and more effective, Professor Lightman says they are not valid.

Lightman explains that human limbs cool and that the degree of blood flow to the wrist – unlike the face – varies greatly, so it’s not a good place to take a temperature.

The third claim: eating meat Animal Llama can help fight corona virus

Verdict: There is no scientific evidence to support these claims.

Since the start of the Corona epidemic, ineffective and unproven treatments for Covid-19 have spread online, and in some cases prominent politicians have promoted a number of them.

But this alleged treatment is new to us.

One of the regional rulers in Peru suggested that eating llamas and alpacas (camel animals that live in Latin America) may help fight the Corona virus.

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                Eating llama meat does not prevent corona virus
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    </figure><p>According to a Peruvian radio, the governor mentioned studies indicating that llamas and alpacas contain antibodies that may be modified to develop a treatment for Covid-19.

The BBC’s scientific team had published a report on this study earlier, but this research does not conclude that eating the meat of these animals may help a person resist the virus. Rather, scientists have concluded that the antibodies present in the llama’s body may be extracted and modified in order to make a treatment for humans.

So far, there are no therapies that have proven effective in saving lives during clinical trials other than the uses of dexamethasone and hydrocotizone.

Fourth claim: Corona virus can be prevented by some kind of treatment Homeopath It is called arsenicum album

Verdict: There is no scientific evidence to support the use of homeopathic remedies (homeopathy, which is a type of alternative medicine) to prevent Covid-19.

India’s Ministry of Alternative Medicine is promoting the use of a homeopathic remedy called orcinicum album, saying it may help prevent infection with the Coronavirus.

However, no other scientific research supports its use as a preventive treatment for Covid-19.

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                There is no scientific evidence supporting the use of homeopathy in the treatment or prevention of Coronavirus
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    </figure><p>India's PTI news agency recently reported that the western Indian state of Gujarat had distributed the drug to more than half of its population as a preventive treatment.

A prominent health official in the state said that she believed that there was “some efficacy” for the drug to prevent Corona virus, but acknowledged that “confirmation of this requires a more accurate analysis.”

There is no evidence that this drug is effective, either in preventing Covid-19 or in treating people with it.

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