“May help prevent the virus.” … Scientists are developing a muzzle that captures and kills corona

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A British hospital in Wales plans to give nicotine as a treatment to coronavirus patients amid growing evidence that smokers are less at risk, according to the newspaper. Daily Mail.

Doctors at Royal Glamorgan Hospital, southern Wales, said nicotine stains should be considered urgently as a potential treatment for Covid-19, and are awaiting approval of the experiment.

Studies of hospital patients with corona patients in China, the United States, Italy, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere have shown a surprisingly low prevalence of smokers, believing they are less likely to develop the disease, a theory scientists have described as “strange”.

According to these studies, once smokers become infected with the virus and are hospitalized, they may be more likely to eventually develop disease and death.

The researchers believe that a decrease in addictive chemical nicotine from the patient’s body while in hospital may exacerbate lung damage among smokers, which increases their risk of severe complications.

It has been proven that nicotine prevents lung damage in animals with acute respiratory syndrome, a life-threatening condition that a coronavirus can lead to, and studies have shown that it may prevent an excessive reaction of the immune system called a cytokine storm – a phenomenon that has been found to kill many Corona patients.

Doctors in France had called for experiments on nicotine patches to see if they could have any protective effects against the Corona virus, and they confirmed that it was possible that nicotine and not cigarettes themselves were beneficial.

Doctors at Royal Glamorgan Hospital also published a letter in March indicating that nicotine spots could be therapeutic against the virus, and wrote in the British Medical Journal: “In this new disease smokers seem to have particularly poor results, we suggest that simple use of nicotine patches should be considered.” In it and discuss it urgently. ”

For his part, said Jonathan Davis, consultant injury surgeon at the hospital: “We are looking at a number of potential points where nicotine may be a valid intervention, both in prevention and treatment.”

He added: “Of course, none of them has been proven at the present time, and whether we can move forward or not in more experiments, will depend on the approval and funding that we are looking for urgently at the present time.”

Davis noted that the nicotine patch is inexpensive, has no side effects, and can offer an alternative as scientists race to find a vaccine.





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