In pictures, pollution and noise of humans are absent, so “flamingo” swarms

0
193


An unfamiliar scene with around 150,000 birds in Mumbai, India

Thousands of pink flamingos, “Flamingo”, gathered in Mumbai, India, in an unfamiliar scene, after closures and bans reduced environmental pollution in that crowded spot of human beings, factories, and car and bus smoke.

A video clip shows more than 150,000 of these beautiful birds flying over the city of Mumbai on April 20.

According to “Sky News Arabia”: Environmental researchers pointed out that although flamingos migrate to the region every year, this year has witnessed large numbers of unfamiliar ones.

They explained that the cleanliness of the air and water caused by the imposed closure due to the emerging crisis of the Coronavirus has helped more flamingos attend this year.

Thousands of pink flamingos gathered in Mumbai after the coronavirus was closed in cleaner air and water due to less human activity and pollution.

According to the newspaper, “Daily Mail” British: Some of the city’s residents have confirmed that they had not seen such numbers of flamingo swarms before; which confirms the negative impact of human activities on wildlife in various parts of the world.

The Bombay Natural History Society predicted that the number of flamingos will have increased this year by 25 percent, compared to last year.

Flamingos usually migrate to Mumbai between October and March from Gujarat and Rajasthan, and sometimes they come from as far away as Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran, before proceeding back in June.

In pictures, pollution and noise of humans are absent, so “flamingo” swarms

Already

Thousands of pink flamingos, “Flamingo”, gathered in Mumbai, India, in an unfamiliar scene, after closures and bans reduced environmental pollution in that crowded spot of human beings, factories, and car and bus smoke.

A video clip shows more than 150,000 of these beautiful birds flying over the city of Mumbai on April 20.

According to “Sky News Arabia”: Environmental researchers pointed out that although flamingos migrate to the region every year, this year has witnessed large numbers of unfamiliar ones.

They explained that the cleanliness of the air and water caused by the imposed closure due to the emerging crisis of the Coronavirus has helped more flamingos attend this year.

Thousands of pink flamingos gathered in Mumbai after the coronavirus was closed in cleaner air and water due to less human activity and pollution.

According to the newspaper, “Daily Mail” British: Some of the city’s residents have confirmed that they had not seen such numbers of flamingo swarms before; which confirms the negative impact of human activities on wildlife in various parts of the world.

The Bombay Natural History Society predicted that the number of flamingos will have increased this year by 25 percent, compared to last year.

Flamingos usually migrate to Mumbai between October and March from Gujarat and Rajasthan, and sometimes they come from as far away as Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran, before proceeding back in June.

April 25, 2020 – Ramadan 2, 1441

02:13 PM


An unfamiliar scene with around 150,000 birds in Mumbai, India

Thousands of pink flamingos, “Flamingo”, gathered in Mumbai, India, in an unfamiliar scene, after closures and bans reduced environmental pollution in that crowded spot of human beings, factories, and car and bus smoke.

A video clip shows more than 150,000 of these beautiful birds flying over the city of Mumbai on April 20.

According to “Sky News Arabia”: Environmental researchers pointed out that although flamingos migrate to the region every year, this year has witnessed large numbers of unfamiliar ones.

They explained that the cleanliness of the air and water caused by the imposed closure due to the emerging crisis of the Coronavirus has helped more flamingos attend this year.

Thousands of pink flamingos gathered in Mumbai after the coronavirus was closed in cleaner air and water due to less human activity and pollution.

According to the newspaper, “Daily Mail” British: Some of the city’s residents have confirmed that they had not seen such numbers of flamingo swarms before; which confirms the negative impact of human activities on wildlife in various parts of the world.

The Bombay Natural History Society predicted that the number of flamingos will have increased this year by 25 percent, compared to last year.

Flamingos usually migrate to Mumbai between October and March from Gujarat and Rajasthan, and sometimes they come from as far away as Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran, before proceeding back in June.





LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here